I'm a PhD student researching the role of mortuary archaeology in contemporary British society. Think of this as a scrapbook of all the interesting links, snippets of information and random bits and bobs I come across pertaining to death, dying and the dead. Enjoy?!


Stonehenge: Two tribes go to war – over bones
Two modern-day tribes with competing claims to Stonehenge are set to join battle this week over the remains of the dead. On one side stand the archaeologists, who insist that bones of ancient Britons buried near the monument should be put on display at the new £27m visitor centre, which opens on Wednesday.
Ranged against them is a warband of druids – led by Arthur Pendragon – who are campaigning for the bones to be reburied.
It is a conflict that raises considerable passion, along with questions about human dignity and how best to explain the past to the public. But both sides plan to wage war on the politest of terms: English Heritage has allowed the Loyal Arthurian Warband to hold a protest on Wednesday on its land at the site, while the druid group says “non-violent, direct action” will be used only as a last resort.

(Source: Independent)

Stonehenge: Two tribes go to war – over bones
Two modern-day tribes with competing claims to Stonehenge are set to join battle this week over the remains of the dead. On one side stand the archaeologists, who insist that bones of ancient Britons buried near the monument should be put on display at the new £27m visitor centre, which opens on Wednesday.
Ranged against them is a warband of druids – led by Arthur Pendragon – who are campaigning for the bones to be reburied.
It is a conflict that raises considerable passion, along with questions about human dignity and how best to explain the past to the public. But both sides plan to wage war on the politest of terms: English Heritage has allowed the Loyal Arthurian Warband to hold a protest on Wednesday on its land at the site, while the druid group says “non-violent, direct action” will be used only as a last resort.

(Source: Independent)

Stonehenge: Two tribes go to war – over bones

Two modern-day tribes with competing claims to Stonehenge are set to join battle this week over the remains of the dead. On one side stand the archaeologists, who insist that bones of ancient Britons buried near the monument should be put on display at the new £27m visitor centre, which opens on Wednesday.

Ranged against them is a warband of druids – led by Arthur Pendragon – who are campaigning for the bones to be reburied.

It is a conflict that raises considerable passion, along with questions about human dignity and how best to explain the past to the public. But both sides plan to wage war on the politest of terms: English Heritage has allowed the Loyal Arthurian Warband to hold a protest on Wednesday on its land at the site, while the druid group says “non-violent, direct action” will be used only as a last resort.

(Source: Independent)


Giving Richard III a reburial fit for a medieval king
The first glimpse of how Richard III could be reburied has been revealed, with the service to be shaped by the scholarly detective work of an Oxford University academic.
Alexandra Buckle, from St Anne’s and St Hilda’s colleges, has reconstructed how an authentic medieval reburial service should be conducted.
Dr Buckle, an expert in medieval music and liturgical adviser to the committee planning the reburial, has found the only known surviving description of the prayers and music used for reburying medieval aristocrats.
Reburial was a major event in the 15th Century. Dr Buckle says she was surprised to find how widespread it was.
Her research has shown that reburials had their own separate service, different from an ordinary funeral.
This service provides an evocative picture of the medieval world, full of pomp and piety, with prayers that the dry bones being reinterred would be spared the wrathful judgement of God.

(Source: BBC News)

Giving Richard III a reburial fit for a medieval king
The first glimpse of how Richard III could be reburied has been revealed, with the service to be shaped by the scholarly detective work of an Oxford University academic.
Alexandra Buckle, from St Anne’s and St Hilda’s colleges, has reconstructed how an authentic medieval reburial service should be conducted.
Dr Buckle, an expert in medieval music and liturgical adviser to the committee planning the reburial, has found the only known surviving description of the prayers and music used for reburying medieval aristocrats.
Reburial was a major event in the 15th Century. Dr Buckle says she was surprised to find how widespread it was.
Her research has shown that reburials had their own separate service, different from an ordinary funeral.
This service provides an evocative picture of the medieval world, full of pomp and piety, with prayers that the dry bones being reinterred would be spared the wrathful judgement of God.

(Source: BBC News)

Giving Richard III a reburial fit for a medieval king
The first glimpse of how Richard III could be reburied has been revealed, with the service to be shaped by the scholarly detective work of an Oxford University academic.
Alexandra Buckle, from St Anne’s and St Hilda’s colleges, has reconstructed how an authentic medieval reburial service should be conducted.
Dr Buckle, an expert in medieval music and liturgical adviser to the committee planning the reburial, has found the only known surviving description of the prayers and music used for reburying medieval aristocrats.
Reburial was a major event in the 15th Century. Dr Buckle says she was surprised to find how widespread it was.
Her research has shown that reburials had their own separate service, different from an ordinary funeral.
This service provides an evocative picture of the medieval world, full of pomp and piety, with prayers that the dry bones being reinterred would be spared the wrathful judgement of God.

(Source: BBC News)

Giving Richard III a reburial fit for a medieval king

The first glimpse of how Richard III could be reburied has been revealed, with the service to be shaped by the scholarly detective work of an Oxford University academic.

Alexandra Buckle, from St Anne’s and St Hilda’s colleges, has reconstructed how an authentic medieval reburial service should be conducted.

Dr Buckle, an expert in medieval music and liturgical adviser to the committee planning the reburial, has found the only known surviving description of the prayers and music used for reburying medieval aristocrats.

Reburial was a major event in the 15th Century. Dr Buckle says she was surprised to find how widespread it was.

Her research has shown that reburials had their own separate service, different from an ordinary funeral.

This service provides an evocative picture of the medieval world, full of pomp and piety, with prayers that the dry bones being reinterred would be spared the wrathful judgement of God.

(Source: BBC News)


Student in call to bury giant’s bones
A man who has been campaigning for years for the last wishes of a long-deceased Ulsterman to be respected has made a fresh call for his bones to be removed from display.
PhD student Thomas Muinzer has been pressing for years for the release of Charles Byrne’s skeleton from the Hunterian Museum in the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS), London.
The student of Queen’s Univeristy Belfast garnered national attention over the issue in 2011, and is now restating the call two years on – noting that with the recently-discovered remains of Richard III set to be reinterred, it seems “even more unjust” to display Byrne’s bones against his wishes.
The new call follows the discovery of the remains of the former English king, Richard III, beneath a car park in Leicester last year.
The long-dead royal’s bones are expected to be reinterred in the city’s cathedral.
This, claims Thomas, only adds weight to his own calls for Charles Byrne to be reburied.
“The continued display of his skeleton is unethical and unnecessary,” he said.
“And seems even more unjust given the recent news that Richard III’s remains, after 528 years in an unmarked grave, will finally receive a burial fit for a king. After more than 200 years of display it is now time for the Hunterian Museum to release his skeleton and finally give Charles Byrne a burial fit for a giant.”

(Source: News Letter)

Student in call to bury giant’s bones
A man who has been campaigning for years for the last wishes of a long-deceased Ulsterman to be respected has made a fresh call for his bones to be removed from display.
PhD student Thomas Muinzer has been pressing for years for the release of Charles Byrne’s skeleton from the Hunterian Museum in the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS), London.
The student of Queen’s Univeristy Belfast garnered national attention over the issue in 2011, and is now restating the call two years on – noting that with the recently-discovered remains of Richard III set to be reinterred, it seems “even more unjust” to display Byrne’s bones against his wishes.
The new call follows the discovery of the remains of the former English king, Richard III, beneath a car park in Leicester last year.
The long-dead royal’s bones are expected to be reinterred in the city’s cathedral.
This, claims Thomas, only adds weight to his own calls for Charles Byrne to be reburied.
“The continued display of his skeleton is unethical and unnecessary,” he said.
“And seems even more unjust given the recent news that Richard III’s remains, after 528 years in an unmarked grave, will finally receive a burial fit for a king. After more than 200 years of display it is now time for the Hunterian Museum to release his skeleton and finally give Charles Byrne a burial fit for a giant.”

(Source: News Letter)

Student in call to bury giant’s bones

A man who has been campaigning for years for the last wishes of a long-deceased Ulsterman to be respected has made a fresh call for his bones to be removed from display.

PhD student Thomas Muinzer has been pressing for years for the release of Charles Byrne’s skeleton from the Hunterian Museum in the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS), London.

The student of Queen’s Univeristy Belfast garnered national attention over the issue in 2011, and is now restating the call two years on – noting that with the recently-discovered remains of Richard III set to be reinterred, it seems “even more unjust” to display Byrne’s bones against his wishes.

The new call follows the discovery of the remains of the former English king, Richard III, beneath a car park in Leicester last year.

The long-dead royal’s bones are expected to be reinterred in the city’s cathedral.

This, claims Thomas, only adds weight to his own calls for Charles Byrne to be reburied.

“The continued display of his skeleton is unethical and unnecessary,” he said.

“And seems even more unjust given the recent news that Richard III’s remains, after 528 years in an unmarked grave, will finally receive a burial fit for a king. After more than 200 years of display it is now time for the Hunterian Museum to release his skeleton and finally give Charles Byrne a burial fit for a giant.”

(Source: News Letter)

A grave undertaking… Victoria Station cemetery is departing from Platform 1

Hundreds of poor families are believed to be buried under the rail platforms and buildings, many having fallen victim to Victorian cholera epidemics.
Human remains lying in a mass paupers’ grave under Manchester Victoria station are to be dug up and re-buried five miles away.
Hundreds of poor families are believed to be buried under the rail platforms and buildings, many having fallen victim to Victorian cholera epidemics.
Station bosses say that any remains found at the 150-year-old site – formerly Walker’s Croft burial ground – will be exhumed, placed in coffins and taken to Southern Cemetery in Chorlton…


(Source: Manchester Evening News)
A grave undertaking… Victoria Station cemetery is departing from Platform 1

Hundreds of poor families are believed to be buried under the rail platforms and buildings, many having fallen victim to Victorian cholera epidemics.
Human remains lying in a mass paupers’ grave under Manchester Victoria station are to be dug up and re-buried five miles away.
Hundreds of poor families are believed to be buried under the rail platforms and buildings, many having fallen victim to Victorian cholera epidemics.
Station bosses say that any remains found at the 150-year-old site – formerly Walker’s Croft burial ground – will be exhumed, placed in coffins and taken to Southern Cemetery in Chorlton…


(Source: Manchester Evening News)

A grave undertaking… Victoria Station cemetery is departing from Platform 1

Hundreds of poor families are believed to be buried under the rail platforms and buildings, many having fallen victim to Victorian cholera epidemics.

Human remains lying in a mass paupers’ grave under Manchester Victoria station are to be dug up and re-buried five miles away.

Hundreds of poor families are believed to be buried under the rail platforms and buildings, many having fallen victim to Victorian cholera epidemics.

Station bosses say that any remains found at the 150-year-old site – formerly Walker’s Croft burial ground – will be exhumed, placed in coffins and taken to Southern Cemetery in Chorlton…