I'm a PhD student researching the role of mortuary archaeology in contemporary British society. Think of this as a scrapbook of all the interesting links, snippets of information and random bits and bobs I come across pertaining to death, dying and the dead. Enjoy?!


Dutch artist creates life-size human skull out of COCAINEA Dutch artist has fashioned a human skull out of cocaine by moulding the street-sourced class A drug mixed with gelatin.
The piece, entitled Ecce Animal, is the work of mysterious artist Diddo who says he was commissioned to make the artwork, although is prohibited from disclosing further details.
Diddo says he did not personally test the cocaine but employed a laboratory to analyse the drug bought from a street dealer. 
They found it was between 15 per cent to 20 per cent pure and had been cut with caffeine, paracetamol and sugar.

(Source: Daily Mail)

Dutch artist creates life-size human skull out of COCAINEA Dutch artist has fashioned a human skull out of cocaine by moulding the street-sourced class A drug mixed with gelatin.
The piece, entitled Ecce Animal, is the work of mysterious artist Diddo who says he was commissioned to make the artwork, although is prohibited from disclosing further details.
Diddo says he did not personally test the cocaine but employed a laboratory to analyse the drug bought from a street dealer. 
They found it was between 15 per cent to 20 per cent pure and had been cut with caffeine, paracetamol and sugar.

(Source: Daily Mail)

Dutch artist creates life-size human skull out of COCAINE

A Dutch artist has fashioned a human skull out of cocaine by moulding the street-sourced class A drug mixed with gelatin.

The piece, entitled Ecce Animal, is the work of mysterious artist Diddo who says he was commissioned to make the artwork, although is prohibited from disclosing further details.

Diddo says he did not personally test the cocaine but employed a laboratory to analyse the drug bought from a street dealer. 

They found it was between 15 per cent to 20 per cent pure and had been cut with caffeine, paracetamol and sugar.

(Source: Daily Mail)


Die To Live by Michael Benisty

Coveted New York based Belgian artist, Michael Benisty, introduces “Die To Live,” a breathtaking art and design installation that brings over 700 pounds of mirror-polished stainless steel, sculpted in the shape of a skull and encrusted with 345,798 Golden-Black Swarovski Elements, to be displayed as a spectacular street side exhibit in front of The Catalina Hotel on Collins Avenue, in the heart of South Beach.  The one-of-a-kind 7-foot tall sculpture, produced in partnership with Swarovski and estimated to be valued at more than $150,000, is embedded with a mosaic crystal design known as “Fleur de Lis” and will adorn the face of The Catalina Hotel during Art Basel as one of the most dramatic design installations to-date. Die to live symbolizes the paradox between life and death. The skull represents death but is brought to life by the shimmering of 345,798 Swarovski crystals and it’s mirror-polished stainless steel material. The aim was to build the sculpture big enough to look people right in the eyes, in order to evoke and provoke a discussion of death and we perceive it. It’s beauty, reflecting life, allows the viewer to face this sensitive subject through a deeper perspective. Benisty was already in the process of building the piece while he was shooting Nadja Swarovski for Whitewall magazine. He asked her to look at the skull in development, after which, she fell in love with the project and Die To Live was born. The skull was built in partnership with Shanghai Art Foundry in 2010 and Swarovski completed its crystal design in mid 2011. All together, the design and building process of the sculpture took more than a year, from the clay mold to the stainless steel structure and mirror polishing effect, to its final crystal design application in the shape of a Fleur de Lis design. Die to Live has only been exhibited in the United States and is available at a purchase price of $150,000.  The sculpture will be on display outside the Catalina Hotel.

Love!


Oldest documented evidence of violence between humans
A healed fracture discovered on an  ancient skull from China may be the oldest documented evidence of violence  between humans, a study has shown.
The individual, who lived 150,000-200,000 years ago, suffered blunt force  trauma to the right temple - possibly from being hit with a projectile.
But the ancient hunter-gatherer - whose sex is unclear - survived to tell the  tale: the injury was completely healed by the time of the person’s death.

Click the photo to access the rest of the article.

Oldest documented evidence of violence between humans
A healed fracture discovered on an  ancient skull from China may be the oldest documented evidence of violence  between humans, a study has shown.
The individual, who lived 150,000-200,000 years ago, suffered blunt force  trauma to the right temple - possibly from being hit with a projectile.
But the ancient hunter-gatherer - whose sex is unclear - survived to tell the  tale: the injury was completely healed by the time of the person’s death.

Click the photo to access the rest of the article.

Oldest documented evidence of violence between humans

A healed fracture discovered on an ancient skull from China may be the oldest documented evidence of violence between humans, a study has shown.

The individual, who lived 150,000-200,000 years ago, suffered blunt force trauma to the right temple - possibly from being hit with a projectile.

But the ancient hunter-gatherer - whose sex is unclear - survived to tell the tale: the injury was completely healed by the time of the person’s death.

Click the photo to access the rest of the article.

biomedicalephemera:

Syphilitic skull. 
Tertiary syphilis, untreated for ~27 years. 1910.
From National Museum of Health and Medicine.
biomedicalephemera:

Syphilitic skull. 
Tertiary syphilis, untreated for ~27 years. 1910.
From National Museum of Health and Medicine.

biomedicalephemera:

Syphilitic skull. 

Tertiary syphilis, untreated for ~27 years. 1910.

From National Museum of Health and Medicine.

ryanmatthewcohn:

Human skull cut and mounted in six sections by Ryan Matthew Cohn. Photo by Sergio Royzen.
ryanmatthewcohn:

Human skull cut and mounted in six sections by Ryan Matthew Cohn. Photo by Sergio Royzen.

ryanmatthewcohn:

Human skull cut and mounted in six sections by Ryan Matthew Cohn. Photo by Sergio Royzen.

For sale: one severed head of patron saint of genital disease…

The severed head of a man said to be the patron saint of genital disease will go on auction in County Meath on Sunday.
The skull is allegedly that of St Vitalis of Assisi, an Italian Benedictine monk from the 14th century.
For sale: one severed head of patron saint of genital disease…

The severed head of a man said to be the patron saint of genital disease will go on auction in County Meath on Sunday.
The skull is allegedly that of St Vitalis of Assisi, an Italian Benedictine monk from the 14th century.

For sale: one severed head of patron saint of genital disease…

The severed head of a man said to be the patron saint of genital disease will go on auction in County Meath on Sunday.

The skull is allegedly that of St Vitalis of Assisi, an Italian Benedictine monk from the 14th century.